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Friday, July 17, 2020 | History

2 edition of Estimating seed stored in serotinous cones of lodgepole pine found in the catalog.

Estimating seed stored in serotinous cones of lodgepole pine

James E. Lotan

Estimating seed stored in serotinous cones of lodgepole pine

by James E. Lotan

  • 77 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Intermountain Forest & Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Ogden, Utah .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Lodgepole pine.,
  • Seeds.,
  • Forest regeneration.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 10.

    StatementJames E. Lotan and Chester E. Jensen.
    SeriesUSDA Forest Service research paper INT -- 83.
    ContributionsJensen, Chester E.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination10 p. :
    Number of Pages10
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16022804M

    Seed supplies in non-serotinous stands can be calculated by using the same estimation procedures, with a reduction factor to account for the average ten-year production of cones that is stored in serotinous stands (Lotan and Perry, ). Seed traps can be used to obtain better estimates (Dahms and Bar­ rett, ).   Lodgepole pine may even overwhelm a site with seed stored in serotinous cones. It has four basic successional roles (50): Minor Seral - A component of even-aged stands rapidly being replaced by shade-tolerant associates in 50 to years.

    The viability of the seed stored in serotinous cones of the two pine species begins to decreases once the flame-front residence time at the ground level of an active crown fire exceeds 50 s.   Some lodgepole pines produce thick resin, while others fail to produce any, and release their seeds upon maturity. (Lotan, ) This variation sets up an interesting dichotomy: Areas dominated by serotinous trees quickly recover after fires, as the mature lodgepoles release a great number of seeds en masse. These seeds strike the relatively.

    According to de Groot et al., given typical flame durations, serotinous jack pine (essentially the same species as lodgepole) cones would have essentially p = The complement of viable pine seeds per cone prior to abscission, R, for this area is 21 (Greene, unpublished data).   B. Serotinous Cones: Some forests have serotinous lodgepole pine cones. Lodgepole pine cones are first flared by the standard method. Seed lots showing a high percentage of serotinous cones are then separated and processed over a scalper having a modified screen to separate the serotinous cones from the flared cones. The segregated.


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Estimating seed stored in serotinous cones of lodgepole pine by James E. Lotan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Estimating seed stored in serotinous cones of lodgepole pine. Ogden, Utah: Intermountain Forest & Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, (OCoLC) Estimating seed stored in serotinous cones of lodgepole pine Estimating seed stored in serotinous cones of lodgepole pine by Lotan, James E; Jensen, Chester E.

Publication date Topics Lodgepole pine, Seeds, Forest regeneration Publisher Ogden, Utah: Intermountain Forest & Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. Estimating seed stored in serotinous cones of lodgepole pine. Ogden, Utah: Intermountain Forest & Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture, (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File. Estimating seed stored in serotinous cones of lodgepole pine / Related Titles. Series: USDA Forest Service research paper INT ; 83 By.

Lotan, James E. Jensen, Chester E. Type. Book Material. Published material. Publication info. Since even non-serotinous cones and woody fruits can provide protection from the heat of fire, the key adaptation of fire-induced serotiny is seed storage in a canopy seed bank, which can be released by fire.

The fire-release mechanism is commonly a resin that seals the fruit or cone. Lodgepole pine (closed cones)—Closed or serotinous lodgepole pine cones may be stored for several weeks to several months without damaging the seed. The cones will stay closed during storage.

Do not expose the cones to direct sunlight that will break the resinous bond that keeps the cones closed. Lodgepole pines, a variety of the pine species Pinus contorta, are a serotinous species -- the seeds are only released from the cones in response to.

Montana. Lodgepole pine invaded sagebrush areas on patches of bare mineral soil as a result of an annual dispersion of seed from open cones. Once lodgepole pine became established and a forest canopy developed, shade-tolerant species are established.

The an­ nual, persistent seedfall from non-serotinous cones plays a role in. (a) A red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) eating a seed from a lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta ssp. latifolia) cone on top of a cone midden; only a few scales remain on the cone (on the distal end, directed downward).(b) Serotinous cones, which can remain closed for several decades unless removed by red squirrels or opened from heat of a fire.

The moisture content and opening of serotinous cones from lodgepole pine killed by the mountain pine beetle. Maria Sharpe, a b Soung Ryoul Ryu a. a Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2H1, Canada.

b Environment and Sustainable Resource Development, Government of Alberta, Lac La Biche, Alberta, T0A. Serotinous lodgepole pine cones are put into the kiln for 17 hours with a peak temperature of 60 degrees Celsius. The cones are currently not scorched or placed in boiling water before kilning.

Lodgepole pine is a relatively easy species to clean (purities of seed in storage average. Jack pine and lodgepole pine have cones that remain closed on the tree (serotinous), and black spruce has semiserotinous cones; these cones do not open to release their seeds until a wax layer is melted by the heat of fire.

White spruce seedlings require the bare mineral soil Read More. Estimating seed stored in serotinous cones of lodgepole pine / By James E. Lotan and Chester E. Jensen Topics: Forest regeneration, Lodgepole pine, Seeds. Publisher: Ogden, Utah:Intermountain Forest & Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture, Johnson EA, Gutsell SL () Heat budget and fire behaviour associated with the opening of serotinous cones in two Pinus species. Journal of Vegetation Science 4, Lotan JE, Jensen CE () Estimating seed stored in serotinous cones of lodgepole pine.

Research Paper INT United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Ogden. They also observed that germination was increased in seeds from serotinous cones by exposure to flames up to about 30 s. Dispersal. Lodgepole pine seeds are wind-dispersed; therefore, most of the seeds are deposited within a few meters of the tree (Perry and Lotan, a, Perry and Lotan, b).

Lodgepole pine seeds remain viable for years within the sealed cone until released by a forest fire. Inland lodgepole pines produce and retain large numbers of both serotinous and open cones.

Each year the open cones rain down thousands of small, winged seeds, while the closed or serotinous cones protect viable seeds until released by a forest. There are concerns that large‐scale stand mortality due to mountain pine beetle (MPB) could greatly reduce natural regeneration of serotinous Rocky Mountain (RM) lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var.

latifolia) because the closed cones are held in place without the fire cue for cone selected 20 stands (five stands each of live [control], 3 years since MPB [3‐yr‐MPB], 6 years.

Seed release in serotinous plants is the first and arguably the most critical step in regeneration (Nathan and Ne’eman ). Serotiny is broadly defined as canopy seed storage (sensu Lamont et al. ) in Rocky Mountain (RM) lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl.

ex. Throughout much of its range, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl.) produces serotinous cones.

Because of a resinous bond between the cone scales, serotinous cones do not open at maturity. When subjected to temperatures of 45 to 50 degrees C. (or even higher), the bond breaks, the cones are free to open, and stored seed is released. Wildfires cause cones to open and cones on or near the.

New, unopened cones and old, closed cones collected from 9 Pinus contorta var. latifolia trees in Idaho and Washington were classified as serotinous (>90% closed cones), non-serotinous (cones), or intermediate, stored for several weeks and immersed in a water bath at 35 deg C.

The temp. was raised in 5 deg C steps until all cones were fully opened.• A year-old P. pinaster stand had a smaller seed bank (12 viable seeds ha−1) and a lower percentage of serotinous cones (%), with lower cone-opening temperature ( ± °C.seeds from serotinous cones of Rocky Mountain lodgepole pine (also called “closed cones”), count the seeds, report their results, and analyze their pooled data.

Then they calculate the number of seeds from serotinous cones that might germinate in a small forest after a crown fire has swept through.